March 17, 2020

The Institute for Bible Translation has recently published Bible Stories in the Altai language. Earlier publications in this language include the 1910 edition of the Four Gospels (reprinted by IBT in 1975); the Gospel of Mark (1996); Jesus, Friend of Children (1997); the Gospel of Luke and Acts (1999); the Children's Bible (2002); the New Testament (2003); and the New Testament (2nd edition, bilingual, 2017).

In order to help Altai readers access Bible Stories, the Institute has also produced an audio recording of the text, which in the near future will be available for download in the audio section of the IBT website. One can already find the PDF version of the book in the electronic publications section. An Android application with this illustrated book, as well as the audio recording and a parallel Russian text, is also being developed.

June 21, 2017

IBT has published the second edition of the Altai New Testament, fourteen years after the first edition was released (2003). Altai is a Turkic language spoken by about 57,000 people primarily in south Siberia. In response to requests from readers over the past decade, this edition remains a meaning-based translation and has been thoroughly edited to replace many archaic expressions and to simplify overly complex “Biblical style,” thereby achieving greater naturalness and clarity.

Autumn 2016 Newsletter

In Altai historical epics, we frequently come across the following plot: people who have been enslaved and are being driven into a foreign land hang a cradle with a baby on a tree branch in the hope that someone will find and raise their child. Does this sound similar to a well-known story from the Bible?

Autumn 2015 Newsletter on Scripture Engagement

When the Apostle Paul came to preach about Jesus and the resurrection in Athens, he was brought to the Areopagus, since “all the Athenians and the foreigners who lived there would spend their time in nothing except telling or hearing something new” (Acts 17:21). By preaching in the Areopagus, Paul humbly implemented the idea of approaching people where they actually are, not where we as Christians would like them to be. People who are just seeking to hear something new are not necessarily seeking God, and there may in fact be just a few in a crowd who are truly ready to hear God. Nonetheless, Paul was not afraid of speaking in vain. He was simply doing the Lord’s work, and it was up to the Lord to do all the rest. There is no doubt that Paul was the most successful missionary among the Apostles.This principle of reaching people where they are was the foundation of the IBT seminar on Scripture Engagement in summer 2015...