June 23, 2016

A new book has been published in the Lak language of Dagestan. This is the Gospel of Matthew, released together with its audio recording on CD. The PDF version of the book is available for download from the e-book section of IBT website.

The Lak language is spoken by about 146,000 native speakers.The historical center of Lak society is in the town of Kumukh in the highlands of Dagestan, but today most Laks live in the city of Makhachkala near the Caspian Sea and other lowland parts of Dagestan and Russia...

June 21, 2016

IBT has published an illustrated edition of “Gospel Parables” in the Nogai language with a supplemental audio recording on CD. This is the fourth publication in the Gospel Parables series, which began in 2007 with the Agul-language version and continued in 2015-2016 with publications in Dungan and Kumyk. This edition contains four parables from Luke’s Gospel:  the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-35),  the Wedding Feast (Luke 14:16-23), the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32), and the Tax Collector and Pharisee (Luke 18:10-14).

June 16, 2016

IBT has published the first-ever translation of the full Bible in Crimean Tatar, a Turkic language spoken by about a quarter of a million people, primarily on the Crimean peninsula in the Black Sea (related but not identical to the Tatar language spoken in Kazan and the Volga region of north central Russia). The translation team included Crimean Tatar writers together with specialists in the field of Bible translation from IBT and IBT’s international partner organization, Pioneer Bible Translators. The Crimean Tatar language is now one of about 550 languages worldwide that has a full translation of the Holy Scriptures.

The first translations of Scripture materials into Crimean Tatar (previously known as the Cuman language) were done in the 1340s by Franciscan monks, who translated Gospel passages including the prayer “Our Father”.  These passages were added to the unique 13th century trilingual dictionary knows as the Codex Cumanicus...

04.06.2016

An international conference on the writings of St. Paul, organized by the Institute for Bible Translation, the St. Thomas Institute (www.sfoma.ru) , and St. Andrew’s Biblical-Theological Institute (www.standrews.ru ) was held June 2-4, 2016 at the St. Thomas Institute in Moscow. The conference brought together biblical scholars from Russia, Europe and the United States to share their research on issues in Pauline studies.  The conference was attended by about 50 people, not only scholars but also members of Moscow churches who are interested in Biblical scholarship.

Summer 2016 Newsletter

At the Institute for Bible Translation we are always reflecting upon the importance of translating the Bible into people’s “heart language”. But what do we usually think of when we speak about one’s heart language? The first idea that comes to mind is that this is the language that a person speaks in his or her daily life, the language that is the easiest and most natural one for conveying meaning to other people. It is interesting that the more we talk with representatives of different people groups and cultures who are working with IBT in Bible translation or Scripture engagement, the more this seemingly obvious picture becomes blurred and loses its defined contours. Surprisingly so! It seems more likely that the concept of “heart language” goes beyond the language itself and involves the whole cultural worldview and the layer of deepest emotions and childhood or even genetic memories...