Autumn 2016 Newsletter

In Altai historical epics, we frequently come across the following plot: people who have been enslaved and are being driven into a foreign land hang a cradle with a baby on a tree branch in the hope that someone will find and raise their child. Does this sound similar to a well-known story from the Bible?

August 22, 2016
Kurdish-Kurmanji Psalms & Proverbs Cyrillic
Kurdish-Kurmanji Psalms & Proverbs Latin

Two Old Testament books – Psalms and Proverbs – have recently been published in the Kurmanji dialect of the Kurdish language. Kurds speaking this dialect live primarily in Armenia, Georgia, the Central Asian republics, and several regions of the Russian Federation. Literacy in this dialect of Kurdish was introduced in 1946 on the basis of the Cyrillic alphabet with additional letters.

June 23, 2016

A new book has been published in the Lak language of Dagestan. This is the Gospel of Matthew, released together with its audio recording on CD. The PDF version of the book is available for download from the e-book section of IBT website.

The Lak language is spoken by about 146,000 native speakers.The historical center of Lak society is in the town of Kumukh in the highlands of Dagestan, but today most Laks live in the city of Makhachkala near the Caspian Sea and other lowland parts of Dagestan and Russia...

June 21, 2016

IBT has published an illustrated edition of “Gospel Parables” in the Nogai language with a supplemental audio recording on CD. This is the fourth publication in the Gospel Parables series, which began in 2007 with the Agul-language version and continued in 2015-2016 with publications in Dungan and Kumyk. This edition contains four parables from Luke’s Gospel:  the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-35),  the Wedding Feast (Luke 14:16-23), the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32), and the Tax Collector and Pharisee (Luke 18:10-14).

June 16, 2016

IBT has published the first-ever translation of the full Bible in Crimean Tatar, a Turkic language spoken by about a quarter of a million people, primarily on the Crimean peninsula in the Black Sea (related but not identical to the Tatar language spoken in Kazan and the Volga region of north central Russia). The translation team included Crimean Tatar writers together with specialists in the field of Bible translation from IBT and IBT’s international partner organization, Pioneer Bible Translators. The Crimean Tatar language is now one of about 550 languages worldwide that has a full translation of the Holy Scriptures.

The first translations of Scripture materials into Crimean Tatar (previously known as the Cuman language) were done in the 1340s by Franciscan monks, who translated Gospel passages including the prayer “Our Father”.  These passages were added to the unique 13th century trilingual dictionary knows as the Codex Cumanicus...