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Winter 2022-2023 Newsletter on the Kurdish-Kurmanji project

The full Bible in the Kurmanji dialect spoken by Kurds in Armenia and Russia is in the final stages of work, and we at IBT hope that it will be published already in 2024. At this last stage of work, the figure of the philological editor becomes particularly important. This is the translation team’s mother-tongue Kurmanji speaker who improves the translation in terms of grammar, spelling, punctuation, and naturalness, and together with the other team members assesses corrections suggested by reviewers. In the course of the past several decades of work, the IBT/SIL/UBS Kurmanji translation project has had several philological editors, and a highly professional new language specialist joined the team in 2017 – just in time to pull together the work on the full Bible...

November 9, 2022

The Institute for Bible Translation (IBT) has released Genesis and Exodus in the Yakut language.

The Yakuts (endonym: Sakha) are an indigenous people of eastern Siberia and the Far East region of the Russian Federation. The Yakut language belongs to the Turkic group of languages. According to the 2010 All-Russian population census, it is spoken by about 450,000 people.

Both of these books are distinguished by a variety of literary styles: sometimes it is a solemn narrative, at other times, a long genealogical list, or a beautiful blessing in verse. In order to convey the exact meaning of these two books in modern literary Yakut...

Autumn 2022 Newsletter on the Altai project

Synaru, a member of IBT’s Altai translation team, recently visited IBT Moscow office and shared her joy with us: she had just defended her Master’s thesis in theology on the topic of Bible translation into Altai. However, the time to relax and celebrate was very short: Synaru was now facing her next challenge – to revise the Altai NT Epistles so that they would be more easily understood by Altai believers. 

Synaru’s university education was in philology (language and literature studies), and as already mentioned above, her graduate studies were in theology. But what a long path she had to tread to attain her degrees! “I was born in the mountains and grew up in a shepherd’s family,”  she started her story. “Our settlement on the Kazakh-Mongolian border was the most remote village from the capital in Gorno-Altaisk and therefore the furthest from civilization in the entire Republic of Altai...