April 28, 2017

IBT held a translator training seminar April 26-28 at the Tsadasa Institute of Language, Literature and the Arts in the city of Makhachkala in Dagestan. The seminar was devoted to practical language issues encountered by Bible translators. The fifteen seminar participants (primarily translators or philological editors in IBT’s translation projects) represented seven languages of the North Caucasus –  Avar, Balkar, Bezhta, Dargi, Kumyk, Lak and Tabasaran.

April 27, 2017

IBT has recently published a trial translation of the Old Testament books of Ruth and Jonah in the Gagauz language. Gagauz is a Turkic language spoken by approximately 170,000 people, primarily in southern Moldova and Ukraine.

This is the first time that these two books have been translated into Gagauz. Prior to this, the only portions of the Old Testament translated into Gagauz were Fr. Mikhail Chakir’s translations of the Sacred History of the Old Testament (1907) and Psalms (1936), and IBT’s translation of the Liturgical Six Psalms or Hexapsalmos (2011). IBT also translated the full New Testament (2006) and Children’s Bible (2011) into Gagauz.

April 12, 2017

IBT has published the book of Proverbs, one of the Wisdom Books of the Old Testament, in Kabardian, a language belonging to the West Caucasian language family. According to the census of 2010, there are more than 500,000 Kabardians in the Russian Federation, primarily in the Kabardino-Balkaria region of southern Russia. Proverbs is the third book of the OT published by IBT in Kabardian, following the Ruth/Jonah publication of 2009. The Kabardian New Testament was published by IBT in 1993. These books can be read online or downloaded from IBT’s website. Work on the OT is ongoing, with the book of Daniel next in line for printing.

March 3, 2017
This book, written by IBT translation consultant Alexey Somov, was published by T&T Clark Bloomsbury and has been on the market since Feb. 2017.This book is a revised version of his PhD dissertation defended in January 2014 at VU University Amsterdam.
Questions regarding the afterlife are many, and the Gospel of Luke and the book of Acts pay a great deal of attention to them: why does Luke speak about several different forms of the afterlife? Why is resurrection described as a person's transformation into an angelic being? How many abodes are appointed for the righteous and the wicked after death? Alexey Somov addresses these queries in relation to the apparent confusion and variety found in the text, and in respect of the interrelatedness of these issues, and their connection with other eschatological issues in Luke-Acts, and in relation to the wider cultural context of the Mediterranean world to which Luke belonged.